The practice of the Exchequer court, with its severall offices and officers
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The practice of the Exchequer court, with its severall offices and officers being a short narration of the power and duty of each single person in his severall place : written at the request of the Lord Buckhurst, sometime Lord Treasurer of England

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Published by Printed by T.R. for Tim Twyford and W. Place ... in London .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • England and Wales. -- Exchequer,
  • Civil procedure

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Sr. T.F. ; whereunto are added the rules and orders of proceedings by English bill
SeriesEarly English books, 1641-1700 -- 562:15
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination[8], 160, [3] p
Number of Pages160
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15038523M

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The practice of the exchequer court: with its severall offices and officers: being a short narration of the power and duty of each single person in his severall place. [Peter Osborne; Thomas Fanshawe]. The practice of the exchequer court with its severall offices and officers. [Peter Osborne; Thomas Fanshawe] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for Contacts Search for a Library. Create. The practice of the Exchequer court, with its severall offices and officers: being a short narration of the power and duty of each single person in his severall place. Written at the request of the Lord Buckhurst, sometime Lord Treasurer of England. By Sr. T.F. Whereunto are added the rules and orders of proceedings by English bill. Practice of the Exchequer Court, with its severall offices and officers. Being a short narration of the power and duty of each single person in his severall place. Written at the request of the Lord Buckhurst, sometime Lord treasurer of England. By Sir * Research Student, Clare College, Cambridge University.

The Dialogus de Scaccario, or Dialogue concerning the Exchequer, is a mediaeval treatise on the practice of the English Exchequer written in the late 12th century by Richard FitzNeal. The treatise, written in Latin, [1] and known from four manuscripts from the 13th century [2] is set up as a series of questions and answers, covering the jurisdiction, constitution and practice of the Exchequer. Other articles where Court of Exchequer is discussed: Court of Common Pleas: of King’s Bench and the Court of Exchequer for common-law business. The result was an accumulation of many complicated and overlapping jurisdictional rules. By the 19th century the multiple form of writs and competing jurisdictions had become unbearable, and the Judicature Act of brought about a replacement. The Exchequer of Pleas or Court of Exchequer was a court that dealt with matters of equity, a set of legal principles based on natural law and common law in England and ally part of the curia regis, or King's Council, the Exchequer of Pleas split from the curia during the s, to sit as an independent, central court. The Court of Chancery's reputation for tardiness and expense. Here at Exchequer Court we are proud to have a number of class leading amenities in our building. has been designed to provide visitors and prospective occupiers with general information on the building and the services that are provided.. For occupiers working within Exchequer Court, there is also an exclusive logged-in area where you can access personalised information.

The Treasury, with which the Exchequer was in practice joined, dates from before the Norman Conquest (), and the name “Exchequer” came quite early to be applied to the two jointly. The lower Exchequer, or receipt, closely connected with the permanent Treasury, was an office for the receipt and payment of money. Records of the Exchequer, the main financial department of the medieval and early modern English state, responsible for the accounting and audit of Crown (and therefore government) revenue; its predecessor the Receipt; and records of the Office of First Fruits and Tenths and the Courts of General Surveyors and Augmentations (held in the Augmentation. It was routinely carried into the Court of King's Bench by the Secondary (deputy official) in the King's Remembrancer's Office, to assert privilege of the Exchequer: under this privilege, the Court of Exchequer reserved the right to hear suits brought against any of the Exchequer's Material: Parchment. The Practice of the Exchequor Court, with its severall Offices and Officers. Being a short narration of the power and duty of each single person in his severall place. Written at the request of the Lord Buckhurst, sometime Lord Treasurer of England, (there is at Oxford a manuscript of this or a similar treatise by Fanshawe, Catal MSS. Angl. (Coll. Oxon.), ii. ).